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Hi there!

This week it's all about finding answers to some of the questions that have been hot in the startup space for a few weeks.

  • What is the algorithm of success?
  • What is it like to be a woman at a tech event?
  • What happens if computer/AI predict which startups will be successful?
  • We have the technology to design humans now, but should we?
  • Although there's twice the number of female VCs now, the funding gap between female led startups and male led startups have increase. Why?

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How does someone as Jack Dorsey go from a 14-year-old computer science nerd to serial entrepreneur, the co-founder and CEO of Twitter and Square? How does 3M consistently, innovate, developing simple but iconic products like post-it notes? It’s not a matter of luck. It’s an algorithm.

How does someone as Jack Dorsey go from a 14-year-old computer science nerd to serial entrepreneur, the co-founder and CEO of Twitter and Square? How does 3M consistently, innovate, developing simple but iconic products like post-it notes? It’s not a matter of luck. It’s an algorithm.

Female entrepreneurs receive only about 2% of all venture funding, despite owning 38% of the businesses in the country. The prevailing hope among academics, policy makers, and practitioners alike has been that this gap will narrow as more women become venture capitalists. However, homophily does not seem to be the only culprit behind the funding gap.

Over the past several years, the U.S. has seen an increase in the number of female venture capitalists (from 3% of all VCs in 2014 to an estimated 7% today), but the funding gap has only widened. Male-led startups in our sample raised five times more funding than female-led ones.

Find out why here.

With genetic alterations, we might be able to withstand anthrax attacks or epidemics of pneumonic plague. We might revive extinct species such as the woolly mammoth. We might design plants that are far more nutritious, hardy, and delicious than what we have now.

Read more about how scientists in Oregon have successfully edited human genes linked to cystic fibrosis and other fatal hereditary conditions. But, should we? What's next?

In 2009, Ira Sager of Businessweek magazine set a challenge for Quid AI's CEO Bob Goodson: programme a computer to pick 50 unheard of companies that are set to rock the world. 8 years later, the results are nothing short of astonishing.

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